Physical Therapy

The Active Care Rehab Philosophy

Lisa Giannone has developed and masterminded an approach on treating orthopedic and sports injury that has been highly successful. Her system involves a point of view in analysis, the development of a working theory for each individual patient case, and an understanding of mechanics and the kinetic chain and its influence on the recovery path. In her system, each step of the rehab process must be supported by a “why” that both the patient and therapist understand. This is not cookie-cutter or textbook as Lisa’s theories and practices developed out of her academic background in biochemistry, physiology, and biomechanics and through the 26 years of experience she has in the field. The vast majority of the techniques and exercises used to manage AC patients were developed and nuanced by Lisa and make up her system of care and training. All practitioners of AC are trained to practice within this system and learn directly from Lisa. She guides her team from her belief that “Exercise is the Medicine”, “that it is only through methodical mechanical work to the body both manually and through proprietary exercise series that real and lasting, durable recovery can be accomplished in orthopedic and sports injury.”

Dance Medicine

Dance demands mobility, coordination and stamina but is unique in its emphasis on aesthetics and grace of movement. However, like other athletic activities, dancers need strength and stability both to perform and stay injury resistant. Many of the common repetitive use injuries that dancers experience are due to a lack of muscular stability to balance the high degree of mobility needed for dance.

With over fifteen years of experience as rehabilitation and training providers for the San Francisco Ballet, Lines Ballet and regular consultants to Ballet San Jose and the Smuin Ballet, Active Care understands the loads and challenges dance brings to the body. With its emphasis on toning and strength, not muscle size, professional dancers from all over the world have embraced the program.

Young Athlete Program

These days kids are getting more than just bruises and skinned knees.

Sports injuries are on the rise in children and teenagers and many of these young athletes are developing overuse injuries that are due to repetitive motion or repeated impact. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatricians estimates that 50% of all injuries are due to overuse.

Despite their commitment and competitiveness to sports, it’s a mistake to consider young athletes as mini-adults. However, while young athletes have many of the same orthopedic needs of older individuals – muscular strength, neuromuscular re-education, stability, coordination, and balance – they have to be addressed in a manner specific to the young athlete.

Simply put, children and adolescents need more than just ice bags and Band-Aids. Like other serious athletes, kids need sports science based physical therapy to get back on the field, court or track.